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Archive for the ‘Jazz Playlists’ Category

Here’s the playlist for Tueday night’s All That Jazz radio show:

First set a couple of fairly unknown jazz piano players:  Pat Flowers, who recorded during the 40’s, played piano and sang; Putney Dandridge, who also sang and recorded during the middle 30’s.

Pat Flowers and His Rhythm

“Googie Woogie” composed by Flowers from Pat Flowers 1945-1947 (1945) on OJC — Pat Flowers, piano, vocals, leader; Herman Autrey, trumpet; Gene Sedric, clarinet; Jimmy Shirley, guitar; Cedric Wallace, bass; Slick Jones, drums

“Ain’t that just like a woman” composed by Claude Demetrius / Fleecie Moore from Pat Flowers 1945-1947 (1945) on OJC — Pat Flowers, piano, vocals, leader; Herman Autrey, trumpet; Gene Sedric, clarinet; Jimmy Shirley, guitar; Cedric Wallace, bass; Slick Jones, drums.

 

Pat FlowersThis next tune from Flowers is especially interesting.  The tune features vocals from unknown (from a recording standpoint) singer, piano player Bunty Pendleton.  We know next to nothing about Pendleton.  Apparently, this was the one and only time she ever recorded anything (see Tim Brosman’s “A Discography of One: “Horizontal” by Bunty Pendleton”).  She seemed to be most active during the forties.  “Horizontal” was recorded in July of 1946 as a kind of “welcome” back song for the troops post WWII.  She was also gigging at Jimmy Ryan’s East Side on 52nd street in NYC, a club that routinely featured New Orleans style musicians, which may have led Pendleton to find gigs later on.  William Gottlieb has several famous photographs of Pendleton playing piano at “Riverboat on the Hudson”.  Her voice is very low-key, yet has enormous emotional quality.  Judge for yourself from the following video.

  “Horizontal” composed by Hal David / Ricca from Pat Flowers 1945-1947 (1946) on OJC — Pat Flowers, piano, leader; , vocals; Herman Autrey, trumpet; Gene Sedric, clarinet; Jimmy Shirley, guitar; Cedric Wallace, bass; Slick Jones, drums.

 

 

Putney Dandridge

Putney Dandridge, like Flowers and Pendletron, a relatively unknown jazz piano player and vocalist to anyone outside of NYC during the 30’s, played with some of the great swing musicians of the era.

“Nagasaki” composed by Mort Dixon / Harry Warren from Putney Dandridge 1935-1936 (1935) on OJC — Putney Dandridge, piano, vocals, leader; Henry Allen, trumpet; Buster Bailey, clar and alto; Teddy Wilson, piano; Lawrence Lucie, guitar; John Kirby, bass; Walter Johnson, drums

“I’m in the mood for love” composed by Dorothy Fields / Jimmy McHugh from Putney Dandridge 1935-1936 (1935) on OJC — Putney Dandridge, piano, vocals, leader; Henry Allen, trumpet; Buster Bailey, clar and alto; Teddy Wilson, piano; Lawrence Lucie, guitar; John Kirby, bass; Walter Johnson, drums

Here’s Dandridge performing “Cheek to Cheek,” 1935:

 

 

“Cheek to cheek” composed by rving Berlin from Putney Dandridge 1935-1936 (1935) on OJC — Putney Dandridge, piano, vocals, leader; Henry Allen, trumpet; Buster Bailey, clar and alto; Teddy Wilson, piano; Lawrence Lucie, guitar; John Kirby, bass; Walter Johnson, drums

Frankie Newton, trumpeter and bandleader, known for his small combo work in clubs around 52nd street as well as the Cafe Society Club house band (regularly backed Billie Holiday) recorded some great stuff.  Here’s a few examples:

Frankie Newton and His Uptown Serenaders “You showed me the way” composed by Green, et al from Frankies Jump (1939) on Charley Records — Frankie Newton and his Uptown Serenaders: Newton, trumpet; Pete Brown, alto; Cecil Scott, tenor; Don Frye, piano; Richard Fulbright, bass; Co9zy Cole, drums; Clarence Palmer, vocals

Frankie Newton and his Orchestra “Rosetta” composed by Hines from Frankies Jump (1939) on Charley Records — Frankie Newton, trumpet; Mezz Mezzrow, clar; Pete Brown, alto; James P. Johson, piano; Albertr Casey, guitar; JohnKirby, bass; Cozy Cole, drums

Frankie Newton and His Cafe Society Orchestra “Parallel fifths” composed by Newton from Frankie’s Jump (1939) on Charly Records — Frankie Newton and his Café Society Orchestra: Newton, trumpet; Tab Smith, alt; Kenneth Hollon (solo), tenor; Kenny Kersey, piano; Ulysses Livingston, guitar; Johnny Williams, bass; Eddie Dougherty, drums

Fats Waller “Brother, seek and you shall find” composed by Frank Crum / Slam Stewart from Fats Waller 1935, vol 2 (1935) on OJC — Fats Waller, piano, vocals, celeste; Herman Autrey , trumpet; Rudy Powell, clarinet, alto; Jimmy Smith , guitar; Charlie “Fat Man” Turner, bass; Arnold “Scrippy” Bolden, drums

Fats Waller “The girl I left behind me” composed by Edgar Leslie / George W. Meyer / Billy Rose from Fats Waller 1935, vol 2 (1935) on OJC — Fats Waller, piano, vocals, celeste; Herman Autrey , trumpet; Rudy Powell, clarinet, alto; Jimmy Smith , guitar; Charlie “Fat Man” Turner, bass; Arnold “Scrippy” Bolden, drums

Fats Waller “Rhythm and romance” composed by J.C. Johnson / Arthur Schwartz / Richard A. Whiting from Fats Waller 1935, vol 2 (1935) on OJC — Fats Waller, piano, vocals, celeste; Herman Autrey , trumpet; Rudy Powell, clarinet, alto; Jimmy Smith , guitar; Charlie “Fat Man” Turner, bass; Arnold “Scrippy” Bolden, drums

John Kirby and His Orchestra “At the crossroads” composed by Lecuona, Russell from The Biggest Little Band in the Land (1945) on ASV — John Kirby, bass, leader; Charlie Shavers, trum; Buster Bailey, clar; George Johnson, alto; Clyde Hart, piano; Bill Beason, dri,s

John Kirby and His Orchestra “9:20 special” composed by Warren, Engvick from The Biggest Little Band in the Land (1945) on ASV — John Kirby, bass, leader; Charlie Shavers, trum; Buster Bailey, clar; George Johnson, alto; Clyde Hart, piano; Bill Beason, dri,s

John Kirby and His Orchestra “Mop Mop” composed by Demtrius, Williams from The Biggest Little Band in the Land (1945) on ASV — John Kirby, bass, leader; Emmett Berry; George Johnson, alto; Bud Johnson, tenor; Ram Ramirez, piano; Bill Beason, drums

Tab Smith “Cuban Boogie” composed by Smith from Ace High (1952) on Delmark — Tab Smith, alto

Tab Smith “A bit of blues” composed by Smith from Ace High (1952) on Delmark — Tab Smith, alto

Candy Johnson “Freight Train” composed by Trad from Candy’s Mood (1973) on Definitive — Candy Johnson, tenor;

Tubby Hayes “Johnny one note” composed by Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers from The Tubby Hayes quintet down in the village (1962) on Redial — Recorded live at Ronnie Scott’s—Tubby Hayes, tenor, leader; Jimmy Deuchar, trumpet; Gordon Beck, piano; Freddy Logan, bass; Allan Ganley, drums

Ira Sullivan “Con alma” composed by Gillespie from After Hours (1996) on Go Jazz Records — Ira Sullivan, soprano;

Charlie Shavers “Summertime” composed by Gershwin from Shavers Shivers (1950) on Soundies — Charlie Shavers, trumpet, leader

Earl Bostic “Sleep” composed by Earl Lebieg from Earl Bostic for You (1956) on King — Earl Bostic, alto;

Plas Johnson “Hittin’ the Jug” composed by Ammons from Hot, blue, and saxy (1950) on carell music — Plas Johnson, tenor; Cedric Lawson, piano; Richard Reid, bass; John Kirkwood, drums

King Curtis “Da Duh Da” composed by Curtis from The New Scene of King Curtis (1960) on OJC — King Curtis, tenor; Nat Adderley, trumpet; Wynton Kelly, piano; Paul Chambers, bass; Oliver Jackson, drums

Joe Liggins and the Honeydrippers “Pink Champagne” composed by Liggins from Joe Liggins & the Honeydrippers (1950) on Specialty Records — Joe Liggins orchestra, Liggins on piano, vocals

Louis Jordan “Reet, petite, and gone” composed by Jordan from Five Guys Named Moe (1991) on decca — Louis Jordan, tenor, vocals

 

 

 

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The great young vibraphonist Warren Wolf playin’ the shit out of the vibes!

Here are some highlights from tonight’s show.

Warren Wolf.  This guy is an amazing vibraphonist; such energy and hard bop swing.  This is a cut from his second album:

“Soul Sister” composed by Wolf from Convergence (2016) on Mack Avenue Records — Warren Wolf, vibes; Christian McBride, bass; John Scofield, guitar, Brad Mehldau, piano, and drummer Jeff “Tain” Watts.

Freddie Hubbard.  Authentic hard bop; amazing bowed bass solo from Paul Chambers.

Played. “Asiatic Raes” composed by Hubbard from Goin’ Up (1960) on Blue Note — Freddie Hubbard, trumpet; Hank Mobley, tenor; McCoy Tyner, piano; Paul Chambers, bass; Philly Joe Jones, drums

McCoy Tyner.  Tyner’s opening bars are straight blues T-Bone Walker style, but all sweet jazz improvisation.  Listen to this one and then tell me blues is not jazz.  Huh!

“Blues Back” composed by Tyner from The Impulse Story on Impulse — McCoy Tyner, piano, leader; Sonny Stitt, alto; Art Davis, bass; Art Blakey, drums

Oscar Peterson.  A great jazz piano player, full of soul and bebop keyboard runs (jazz music theorists have a word for this).  Scales and chords reek of the blues.  Jazz blues.

“Close your eyes” composed by Peterson from The Jazz Soul of Oscar Peterson (1959) on Verve — Oscar Peterson, piano; Ray Brown, bass; Ed Thigpen, drums

Mose Allison.  Mose is all but known for his vocal jazz/blues, but he is a prolific composer and a piano style that is full of the blues.

“Mojo Woman” composed by Allison from Down Home Piano (1957) on Prestige — Mose Allison, piano; Addison Farmer, bass; Nick Stabulas, drums

Herbie Mann.  Herbie’s popularity began to wan in the seventies after a prolific and successful recording run during the sixties, in spite of the decline of jazz commercially.  Besides Mann’s ridiculously crazy flute work, this particular tune, as well as other cuts on the album, features blues guitarist Duane Allman who takes a couple of rock/blues sounding solos.

“Funky Nassau” composed by Ray Munnings, Tyrone Fitzgerald from Push (1971) on Embryo Records — Herbie Mann, flute, leader; Duanne Allman, guitar solo; Richard Tee, electric piano; Jerry Jemmott, bass; Bernard Purdie, drums

Dave Pike.  A hugely talented, but largely unknown bop vibraphonist.  Mallet madness!

“Cheryl” composed by Charlie Parker from It’s time for dave pike (1961) on Riverside — Dave Pike, vibes, leader; Barry Harris, piano; Reggie Workman, bass; Billy Higgins, drums

Carl Allen & Rodney Whitaker. Carl Allen is a highly respected drummer who has played with hard bop heavyweights Freddie Hubbard, Jackie McLean, Art Farmer, George Coleman and others.  Here in teams with Rodney Whitaker for some “soul-inflected” jazz.

“Get Ready” composed by Robinson from Get Ready — Carl Allen, drums; Rodney Whitaker, bass; Steve Wison, alto; Rodney Jones, guitar; Dorsey Robinson, organ

Marcus Miller

Marcus Miller.  For what ever reason, jazz fusion, Stanley Clarke, Jaco Pastorius, Fender basses, the jazz bass of the 21st century has evolved even more into a solo instrument capable.  Two bassists who have been a part of this new evolution of the electric bass, Marcus Miller and Mitchell Coleman, Jr., illustrate the amazing versatility of the instrument.  First Miller (great guitar solo chops from Adam Agati):

“Detroit” composed by Miller from RENAISSANCE (2012) on Concord — Marcus Miller, bass, leader; Alex Han, alto; Maurice Brown, trumpet; Adam Agati, guitar; Fender Rhodes, Kris Bowers; Louis Cato, drums;

Mitchell Coleman Jr.  Coleman takes the “funky” style bass to a new level here:

“So Funky” composed by Mitchell Coleman, Jr. from Perception — Mitchell Coleman Jr., bass, leader; Mochael Bolivar, tenor; Josh Sklair, guitar; James Gadson, drums

Pepper Adams Quintet. 

“The Long Two/Four” composed by Donald Byrd from 10 to 4 at the 5 spot (1958) on Riverside — Pepper Adams, baritone, leader; Donald Byrd, trumpet; Bobby Timmons, piano; Doug Watkins, bass; Elvin Jones, drums

Willis Jackson.

“Crying” composed by Jackson from Mellow Blues (1970) on UpFront — Willis Jackson, tenor; George Benson, guitar; Dave “Baby” Cortez, organ; Earl Williams, congas and drums

 

 

 

 

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JAM poster 2016

Official 2016 Smithsonian Jazz Appreciation Month Poster

April is one of those months jazz lovers like to salivate over.  Just check out the list of jazz greats who have birthdays in the month of April:  Sarah Vaughn, Billie Holiday, Bessie Smith, Gerry Mulligan, Freddie Hubbard, Duke Ellington, and many, many others.  Too many to name.

Just having the birthdays of Billie Holiday and Duke Ellington alone would be enough to make April a great jazz month, with Billie Holiday’s on the 8th of April and Duke Ellington’s three weeks later on the 29th.

I’ve written earlier posts about Billie Holiday (see esp. Billie Holiday Centennial Birthday) and about Duke Ellington here.  But this week’s All That Jazz program I took the opportunity to play both some of the lesser known jazz artists who have April birthdays as well as perennial favorites like Bessie Smith, who has a birthday tomorrow, April 15.  Here are some of the most notable jazz artists I played:

Walter Bishop, Jr.—Bishop’s piano was a major part of many a bebop recording session.  Here he is leading leading a trio with the brilliant bassist Jimmy Garrison, soon to move to John Coltrane’s band, and bop drummer G.T. Hogan

  • “Blues in the Closet” from Speak Low, 1961; Walter Bishop, piano; Jimmy Garrison, bass; G.T. Hogan, drums
  • “Alone Together” from Speak Low, 1961; Walter Bishop, piano; Jimmy Garrison, bass; G.T. Hogan, drums

 

Joey Defrancesco Trio—Hammond B-3 master Joey Defrancesco is a relatively young guy, born in Springfield, Pennsylvania (near Philadelphia) on April 10, 1971, DeFrancesco was the son of another Philly-area jazz organist, Papa John DeFrancesco, and the grandson of multi-instrumentalist Joe DeFrancesco, who worked with the Dorsey Brothers.  “Cherokee” features George Coleman on the tenor. The recording features an introduction to Coleman, who starts playing off-mic, gradually coming in closer and closer.  Interesting.

  • “Cherokee” from Defrancesco Unauthorized Bootleg, 2007, with Joey Defrancesco, Hammond B-3; George Coleman, tenor; guitarist Jake Langley and drummer Byron Landham”

George Freeman—Chicago born jazz guitarist (1927) Freeman has long been associated with the Chicago soul-jazz movement, but as a young man was good enough to record with many of the great territory bands of the forties.  The two selections here are from radically different time periods, but illustrate Freeman’s progression as an older, wiser guitarist, yet still grounded in that Chicago soul-funk jazz sound.

  • “Happy Fingers” from New Improved Funk, 1972 with George Freeman, leader, guitar; Bobby Blevins, B-3; Von Freeman (George’s older brother), tenor; Leroy Jackson, bass; Bob Guthrie, drums”
  • “Time Was” from Rebellion, 1995 with George Freeman, guitar; Von Freeman, this time on piano

John Levy—New Orleans born (1912) bassist has a birthday this week.  What’s remarkable about Levy is, first of all, his remarkable longevity: he lived to be almost 100 years-old (passed in January of 2012 at the age of 99), his longevity granting him the multiple opportunities to contribute his bass artistry to some of the great all-stars of jazz history.  Second of all, Levy had an interest in and a “head” for business.  In Levy’s own words,

I was probably just more organized than most musicians and had my priorities in order. I came to both of those things accidentally. When I was young, I had no idea how to be a personal  manager or manage talent or anything like that. But as a bassist, I had to listen intently to the musicians I played with, which created a more heightened sense of intuition and sharper instincts. (Jazzwax)

Levy played with jazz violinist Stuff Smith in the early forties at New York’s Onyx Club on 52nd Street (Magic Street).  He was also part of the George Shearing Quintet in the late forties, and did a stint with the Don Byas Quintet in 1945. Three selections follow, not in chronological order:

  • Stuff Smith with John Levy, “Desert Sands”from Stuff Smith 1939-1944, 1943 with Stuff Smith, violin; Jimmy Jones, piano; John Levy, bass.
  • George Shearing Quintet, “Conception” from The definitive George Shearing, 1950, with George Shearing, piano; Joe Roland, vibes; Chuck Wayne, guitar; Denzil Best, drums; John Levy, bass.
  • Don Byas Quintet, “Candy” from Savoy Jam Party, 1945, with Don Byas, leader, tenor; Benny Harris, Trumpet; Jimmy Jones, piano; John Levy, Bass Fred Radcliffe, Drums.

Bud Freeman—The genius tenor saxophonist turns 100 years old this week. Freeman is Chicago-born (1906) and is part of a long line of great jazz musicians from Chicago.  He was one of the original Austin City Gang in 1922 and went on to have a lengthy and influential career in jazz, passing away in 1991 at age 84.  Here are three very different tunes from the late thirties.

  • Bud Freeman and his Orchestra, “Craze-O-Logy” from Bud Freeman 1928-1938, 1928, Bud Freeman, tenor; Johnny Mendel, trum; Bud Jacobson, clar; Dave North, piano; Gene Krupa, drums
  • Bud Freeman Trio, “The Blue Room” from Bud Freeman 1928-1938, 1938, Bud Freeman, tenor; Jess Stacy, piano; George Wettling, drums
  • Jess Stacy and Bud Freeman, “She’s funny that way” from Jess Stacy 1935-1939, 1939, Jess Stacy, piano; Bud Freeman, tenor.  This is one of the most beautiful melodies I’ve ever heard.  Certainly my all-time favorite recording.  The piano/sax harmonies are pure, simple, beautiful.  Highly recommended.

Bessie Smith—This week is the 122nd anniversary of Bessie Smith, The Empress of the Blues.  Bessie was extremely popular during the 20s and 30s.  She is undoubtedly one of the most important jazz/blues singers in all of jazz history, right up there with Louis Armstrong.  It’s hard to imagine the evolution into the American jazz as we know and understand it now without the influence of Bessie Smith.  She combined traditional blues singing—an almost shouting, gospel style—with a New Orleans style swing rhythm.  Listen to Charlie Green improvise call and response behind Bessie’s voice on “Empty Bed Blues”; it’s remarkable.  It’s blues, but it’s also swing.  But she keeps a tight grip on that rhythm, in complete control of the pace and tempo of the song.

  • “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” from Bessie Smith Box Set, originally recorded in 1928, with Bessie Smith, vocals; Lincoln Conaway, guitar; Porter Grainger”
  • “Empty Bed Blues” from Bessie Smith Box Set, originally recorded in 1928, with Bessie Smith, vocals; Charlie Green, trombone; Porter Granger, piano

 

 

 

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